Tag:Kentucky
Posted on: November 17, 2011 11:07 pm
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Recent coaching drunk-driving scandals

In terms of severity, Gary Pinkel’s DWI falls somewhere between Lance Guidry and Bob Huggins on a scale of recent drunk-driving scandals.

Lance Guidry: The Western Kentucky defensive coordinator was cited Saturday in Baton Rouge, the morning of the WKU-LSU game. Not only wasn’t Guidry suspended, he coached in the game.

Coach Willie Taggart said discipline would be handled internally.

Frank Solich: In late 2005 the former Nebraska coach, then at Ohio, was found asleep in his car and charged with drunk driving. Solich contended that he couldn’t have been that hammered compared to the moderate amount of alcohol he consumed.

The Bobcats coach later claimed he was slipped the “date rape” drug GHB. A hair sample tested positive for the substance. Solich later attempted to remove his no contest plea but a wise-ass judge declined saying, “"Fourth-and-goal decisions are difficult and sometimes regretted but usually final nonetheless."

The coach was fined $250, lost his license for six months and was required to participate in an alcohol-education program.

The biggest victim of Solich’s conviction seemed to be assistant wrestling coach Kyle Hansen. In October 2006, Hansen was charged with OVI (Operating a Vehicle Impaired) and wreckless driving. He was fined $1,000 and had his license revoked. Hansen was also suspended by the school. He later appealed the suspension.

Then-AD Kirby Hocutt said at the time that Hansen was not singled out. Hocutt was the AD at Miami when booster Nevin Shapiro was running wild. He left in March, about the same time the NCAA began its investigation, to take the Texas Tech job.

Bob Huggins: On June 12, 2004, the legendary Cincinnati basketball coach was suspended with pay after a spectacular drunk-driving bust. (Check out the video if you can find it).

Huggins was reinstated in August of that year but in May 2005, he was told his contract would not be extended. Later that year he parted ways with the school for a reported $3 million in a going-away compensation package.

Billy Gillispie: Billy Clyde has three priors to his name. He was cited for the third time in August 2009 a few months after being let go at Kentucky. Gillispie is now at Texas Tech.

Posted on: September 27, 2011 5:33 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2011 6:31 pm
 

National notes: What now Missouri?

What now Missouri?

While the school remains conflicted about its place in the Big 12, SEC commissioner Mike Slive pretty much decided Missouri's short-term ambitions when he announced that his league likely will play with 13 teams until at least 2013.

"There are not any other institutions currently under consideration by SEC presidents and chancellors except Texas A&M," Slive repeated again on Tuesday.

As for "informal offers" to Missouri reported by two outlets, it probably comes down to semantics. Define informal. Were these bids made by SEC fans wearing jorts or the commissioner himself? Probably somewhere in between, but certainly not to the level of official consideration by the SEC.

Have there been back-channel communications between the SEC and Missouri? Almost certainly. But legally the SEC can't even hint at an interest in a 14th team. Look what happened to Texas A&M on Sept. 6. It wasn't until the Pac-12 turned down Oklahoma and Texas last week that A&M president R. Bowen Loftin felt comfortable enough to move to the SEC. In other words, when Baylor knew the Big 12 was going to survive there was no need to threaten legal action.

"[At that point], there's really no basis for litigation," Loftin said.

The Show-Me State is in a state of limbo. For the second consecutive year, it has hiked its skirt and flirted a new conference. For the second consecutive year, it could be embarrassed. While that situation could change in 15 minutes, Missouri is in much the same situation it was in June 2010 -- hoping for, but conflicted about taking a lifeline out of the Big 12.

Read between the lines. What's the rush for the SEC? It can play with 13 teams for a couple of years. Who knows if some better school shakes loose? The Big 12 is a daily soap opera. Who knows who is going to be upset tomorrow?



Slive did admit that he has spoken to Loftin about making A&M's first SEC game possibly a stand-alone affair on a special day or at a special time. Think of perhaps Labor Day night Texas A&M vs, maybe, Alabama in a celebration of Bear Bryant? Just speculating.

 


It's been discussed before
but Slive also said there would be discussions about rescinding the two-team limit per conference for BCS bowls. Now that the SEC is the first major conference to grow to 13, it may think it deserves more BCS access.

"There are several issues important enough to have serious discussion," Slive of the BCS going forward. "That would be one of them."




Will Lyles could be the most significant figure of the 2011 season.

The notorious mentor/talent scout/rat now holds the fate of several teams. Lyles told Yahoo! Sports that former Tennessee assistant Willie Mack Garza sent paid for the airfare of Lache Seastrunk for unofficial visit

Several things wrong with that: A school can't pay for unofficial visits. That's why they're unofficial. Garza resigned at USC within a couple of days of Lyles speaking to the NCAA on Aug. 30 in Los Angeles. Oh, and Tennessee just got hit with NCAA penalties, among them "failure to monitor."

The football program got off relatively unharmed when the NCAA penalized Tennessee in August. The NCAA might not be so forgiving if major infractions are found so close together.

The question is, who's next? There's been a buzz since that NCAA sit-down that Lyles has dropped a dime on several schools. In the short term, LSU and Oregon should be concerned. Perhaps Cal as well.

The foundation of this story is an NCAA determined to stamp out third-party influence in college football. Lyles, it seems, has turned state's evidence. All Ohio State did was get to a BCS bowl while its coach intentionally allowed ineligible players to participate. Oregon reportedly asked Lyles to assemble a national recruiting package on fly.

What's worse? I'd be way more worried at Tennessee, LSU, Cal and Oregon.



There has been this rumbling that Texas A&M is making a horrible mistake going to the SEC.

That it is going to be overwhelmed by ES-EE-SEE footbawl. That is has no idea what it is getting into.

Rubbish.

A&M is as committed a football school as there is. I toured the A&M facilities Saturday before the Oklahoma State game and came away impressed. The school's total athletic infrastructure may be better than anything in the SEC. There are fans, I'm told, who park their RVs near the football stadium before the season and don't leave until the last pitch is made in baseball in the spring. That's loyalty.

A&M's one football conference title since the beginnng of 1998, is exactly two less than Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Kentucky, Vanderbilt, Tennessee and Georgia combined in that same time span.

There is no question the Aggies can compete in, and win, the SEC. Here is how I would rate a 13-team SEC in current strength of football program. I'm talking everything, on the field, facilities, recruiting, fans, fund-raising.

Alabama
LSU
Florida
Arkansas
Texas A&M
Auburn
South Carolina
Georgia
Tennessee
Mississippi State
Ole Miss
Kentucky
Vanderbilt



The threat of lightning can postpone a game but when lightning actually strikes, the score stands.

Lightning struck Saturday when Big East officials totally botched that extra point in the Toledo-Syracuse game. The clearly errant Syracuse extra point was ruled good, probably costing Toledo a victory.

Toledo and MAC officials protested but NCAA rules are clear: Once a game is over, it's over. That didn't come into effect a couple of weeks ago in that Utah-USC game.

Here's a solution in such games when officials clearly cost a deserving team a chance at victory (Also see The Fifth Down Game): 

Declare the result vacated. In other words, the stats count by Syracuse and Toledo don't get credit for a win or a loss. Just vacations, same as at Florida State, Alabama and USC for NCAA transgressions, the games simply don't count.

If one or both teams finish 5-6, they would both automatically be bowl eligible (at 6-6). It seems to be the fair thing to do. The screwed team doesn't get a loss and the team that benefits doesn't get a win. Just a thought.



Extending my screed against boards of regents/curators, we give you these brief bios of the Missouri board of curators. These may be the seven people who will decide whether Missouri goes to the SEC.

Warren Erdman -- appointed in 2007 by then governor Matt Blunt. Erdman is executive vice president of administration and corporate affairs for Kansas City Southern. The transportation holding company has investments in the United States, Mexico and Panama.

David Bradley -- was appointed in 2009 by current governor Jay Nixon. Bradley is president of the News-Press & Gazette in St. Joseph.

Don Downing -- appointed in 2009 by Nixon. Attorney who is a former managing general partner of Stinson, Morrison, Hecker in St. Louis and is Missouri's former chief deputy attorney general.

Wayne Goode -- appointed in 2009 by Nixon. A retired former Missouri senator and state representative.

Donald Cupps -- appointed this year by Nixon. Senior partner at Ellis, Cupps and Cole.

Judith Haggard -- appointed in 2007 by Blunt. A family nurse practitioner and drug abuse counselor.

David Steward -- appointed this year by Nixon. Deep breath here, kids. Steward is chairman and founder of World Wide Technology of St. Louis, a leading systems integrator that provides technology products, services and supply chain solutions to customers around the globe.
Posted on: April 4, 2011 1:11 pm
 

A lecture for Big Blue Nation re: "The Question"

HOUSTON -- For all of you who weren't actually there, I wasn't baiting John Calipari. I wasn't trying to upset him. I was trying to get an anecdote and/or quote for my story.


It worked. I filed the story, and moved on. Obviously, some of you haven’t.


To make things perfectly clear, there is an interview session with each head coach and selected players on the Friday before the Final Four. Anything is in play, well, basically there's free speech and we're the folks who exercise it every day. Anything is in play, especially for the coaches who have so many obligations that if you have a question to ask, you better do it then. So I did. Near the end of Calipari's on-podium interview session I prefaced a question to him by saying, "I'm being facetious ..."


We made eye contact -- him on the podium, me out in the great media beyond. 


How does it feel to coach in your first Final Four?


Funny. Clever. No harm, no shady ACT score. At that point, I'm pretty sure Cal "got" what I was going for. It wasn't one of those "do you still beat your wife?" questions where you're guilty either way. 


Let's just say that the question was a lot better than the answer.


"I don’t deal with that," Calipari said. "We’ve been here three times. Those players played those games and did what they were supposed to. I’m so proud of what they’ve all accomplished. It’s been fun. It’s been a good experience. This is going to be a good experience."


Fair enough. End of discussion. So I thought. It started with various friends and colleagues coming up to me in the media work room asking, "Was that you who asked the question?" Well, yes. "Great job." 


Again, I wasn't looking for attention. It was probably a question that needed to asked over the weekend in some form. I chose the path of, what I thought, was least resistance. But when word got to cyberspace, it seemed like half of you congratulated me for asking the Kentucky coach "The Question", the other half of you reside in no-maintenance condos in Big Blue Nation.


I understand that your views are clouded by adoration of a man who makes $3 million a year at the state university for coaching basketball. What you don't get is that's the reason that question had to be asked. Calipari is a public figure, maybe the highest paid state employee in the state. If the governor had stains on his record, wouldn't legitimate questions be worth it? 


I also understand that the BBN reaction to "The Question" is the same reason some Bucknuts are tired of the Jim Tressel criticism. Both guys win. That, to me, has always been the thinnest argument. You are who you have beaten. If Cal won half his games or Tressel was on the other end of those Michigan scores, they would suddenly become a lot dumber.


That's why BBN -- and its kin in college athletics -- need us: The objective, the even-handed, the informed. Yes, even the opinionated. The basic duty of the media is to be a watchdog over the rich and powerful. That's why the Fiesta Bowl was taken down. That's why there is a cloud of scandal hanging over college football and basketball. That's why NCAA president Mark Emmert squirmed last week when he was asked is salary on PBS' Frontline. Sooner or later, we'll know it. We deserve to know it. 


You may not care but that's why we do what we do. Sometimes we give you stuff you need to read, as opposed to want you want to read.


I speak for my colleagues when I say the only thing we'll root for tonight is a goody storylines, a quick game and a media shuttle that is prompt. Whether I or anyone else ask Jim Calhoun a tough question matters. We have a narrow window to ask it, public officials are accountable and whether you admit it or not, you want to know.


Someone now please help me down off my soap box. 


Category: NCAAB
Posted on: March 7, 2011 11:13 am
Edited on: March 7, 2011 11:28 am
 

Pat Knight fired

Pat Knight has been fired as coach at Texas Tech, the school just confirmed. Knight will coach through the Big 12 tournament this week.

The son of Bobby could not survive his second losing season in the last three years in Lubbock. Pat took over in 2007-08. His teams never made the NCAA tournament. His 2009-10 team went to the NIT quarterfinals. This season's team is 13-18 heading into Wednesday's first-round Big 12 tournament game against Missouri.

Pat succeeded his father in 2008. Bobby had gone 138-82 in six-plus seasons. He took the Red Raiders to four NCAA tournaments, the last in 2007. 

Pat was almost the antithesis of his bullying father. He was humble, articulate and went out of his way to be expansive with reporters. Obviously, one of the names that will come up to replace him is former Texas A&M and Kentucky coach Billy Gillispie.

Pat's firing comes only a few days after Kirby Hocutt was hired as Texas Tech's new athletic director.
Posted on: December 7, 2010 4:07 pm
 

Wannstedt out at Pittsburgh

Dave Wannstedt has been fired at Pittsburgh according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

A year after winning 10 games, Pittsburgh stumbled to a 7-5 finish after starting the season ranked No. 15. Wanny's legacy will be one of never quite getting over the top. He had some great individual players but that talent never turned into consistent success.

The Panthers won their seventh game Saturday with one of those talents, tailback Dion Lewis, going for 261 yards against Cincinnati. Pittsburgh will play Kentucky Jan. 8 in the BBVA Compass Bowl.

Pittsburgh remains a plum job for the right coach. Is it too wacky to think Rich Rodriguez might pursue the opening if he is canned at Michigan? He'd only have to go to West Virginia once every two years.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: October 14, 2010 5:15 pm
Edited on: October 15, 2010 1:31 am
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

Watch Oklahoma State's Justin Blackmon at Texas Tech. He just might be the best receiver in the country. The problem is OSU is 0-6 in Lubbock during the Big 12 era. Overall, the Cowboys haven't won in Lubbock since 1944 ... The remaining 59 teams in I-A will have played half of their regular-season schedules after this weekend, including USC which will play its seventh of 13 games ... If Ohio State is able to hold on to the No. 1 ranking for four more Sundays this season it would pass Oklahoma to become the most-frequent No. 1 in AP poll history. The Bucks became No. 1 for the 94th time this week. Only Oklahoma (97) and Notre Dame (95) have been No. 1 more often ... If anyone had told you Louisville would be 4-2 halfway through its first season post-Kragthrope would you have laughed? The Cards would be just that if they win Friday night against Cincinnati...

Miami (3-2) reaches the halfway point in its season this week at Duke a candidate for the nation's most disappointing team. The record isn't terrible, it's more where the program stands right now -- No. 3 in the state. Jacory Harris has been uneven. FSU ran the Canes out of their own building. You look at the talent and just think Miami should be better. You can have your argument between Florida State (5-1) and Florida (4-2) right now but it's clear the Hurricanes -- in the middle of a comeback -- are in danger of finishing back in the pack in 2010's in-state race ...

Bad game of the week: Eastern Michigan (0-6) at Ball State (2-4). The teams are a combined 4-32 since the beginning of 2009 ... Army and Rutgers play the first college game in new Meadowlands Stadium ... Utah (at Wyoming) has scored at least 56 in three consecutive games ... Jim Tressel is the first Big Ten coach to win 100 games in 10 seasons ... Alabama continues a rather remarkable streak not having allowed a 100-yard rusher in 40 consecutive games ... Mississippi State (at Florida) is shooting for its first four-game winning streak since 1999 ... Something to consider while boarding the South Carolina bandwagon: Stephen Garcia is 11-2 at home, only 1-5 on the road heading to Kentucky ... Steve Spurrier is 18-0 vs. the Wildcats combined at Florida and South Carolina ... Oregon State has lost one turnover this season ... TCU is back in a familiar spot leading the nation in total defense. That's where the Frogs finished the last two seasons ... Denard Robinson's Heisman season -- and maybe Michigan's season -- hangs in the balance. Robinson is facing the country's No. 2 rush defense in Iowa ... Michigan State (vs. Illinois) is going for its first 7-0 start since its 9-0 start in 1966 ...

I thought we'd gotten over this: The replay official in last week's controversial Oregon State-Arizona game was an Arizona grad. How can that be?

 

Posted on: October 4, 2010 12:46 pm
 

National notes

Before we begin, here is your daily dose of Les Miles. Actually, it's the only dose of Les Miles you need for this week. If you learn anything more from this postgame video about Saturday's Unlucky 13 vs. Tennessee, let me know.


**A warning going into Week 6 ...

There is a real chance almost halfway through the season of an unprecedented logjam at the top of the BCS -- six undefeated conference champions, four of them in BCS leagues.

It's early but there is some separation and definition to the season after five weeks. Alabama is clearly the class of the SEC. Nebraska and Oklahoma are undefeated in the Big 12, and can't meet until the conference championship game. Ohio State's trip to Wisconsin in a couple of weeks suddenly looks less daunting. Boise State is going to rush through the WAC. TCU and Utah are likely to decide the Mountain West head-to-head. Oregon looks like it is going to run away with the Pac-10.

If all that happens, here is one projection of how the final BCS standings might look. Is too early? Never. The first BCS standings will be released in two weeks.

1. Alabama: With all the talk about the Pac-10's strength this season, the SEC still rules. The Tide are all but assured of playing three more ranked teams -- South Carolina, LSU and Auburn.

2. Oregon: Pollsters are already falling in love with the Ducks despite a dicey strength of schedule to this point.

3. Ohio State: Like Alabama, likely to play three more ranked teams (Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan). If you think the Big Ten's strength will carry the Buckeyes into the top two, think again. Oregon's offense is stronger and will make a stronger case, especially on the road where Jim Tressel seems to play conservatively.

4. Big 12: I am well aware that Kansas, Oklahoma State and Missouri are also undefeated making it five in this league. I'm also projecting that, regardless, this is where an undefeated Big 12 champion would end up if everyone else wins out. Among the five Big 12 undefeateds: Kansas State plays Nebraska, Oklahoma State and Missouri. Missouri plays Kansas State, Oklahoma and Nebraska. Nebraska plays  Kansas State, Oklahoma State and Missouri. Oklahoma plays only Missouri and Okie State. The Cowboys still have Kansas State, Nebraska and Oklahoma.

5. TCU/Utah: The Mountain West race will come down to the teams' Nov. 6 meeting in Salt Lake City. If either finishes undefeated it will most likely finish ahead of an undefeated Boise.

6. Boise State: There was bad, bad news for the Broncos on Sunday. They were jumped in both polls by Oregon for No. 3 in the rankings despite having superior accomplishments and super schedule strength to this point. Oregon has played a I-AA (Portland State) and a team that might as well be I-AA (New Mexico). Boise has played two ranked teams, one in the top 10 on the "road" (Virginia Tech at FedEx Field).

For the previous two weeks Boise, at No. 3, had gained on No. 2 Ohio State and pulled away from the No. 4 team. After one week of WAC play -- against admittedly horrible New Mexico State -- the voters have fallen in love with Oregon and are already damning the Broncos for their schedule.

There are 18 remaining undefeated teams. Five of those (28 percent) are in the Big 12. By the end of this week there will be 16 because of head-to-head meetings (Michigan State-Michigan, Nebraska-Kansas State). Also, by the end of the week a maximum of 11 teams will have the possibility of finishing undefeated because of assured head-to-head games. After this week only four undefeated teams will be alive in the Big 12; three in the Big Ten. Only one undefeated team (at most) will be able to come out of the Mountain West, Pac-10, SEC and WAC.

**Texas is out of the AP poll for the first time in 162 weeks (2000). The streak in the coaches' poll had lasted 192 weeks. Texas, 3-2, still has games left against Nebraska, Oklahoma State and Texas A&M meaning it could be headed for its worst season since before Mack Brown arrived in 1997.

**TCU posted its first road shutout of an opponent in Gary Patterson's 10 years as head coach, 27-0 at Colorado State. That's significant because Patterson is a defensive wizard whose teams have finished tops in total defense each of the last two seasons.

**Speaking of the Horned Frogs, the interest in the Big East is apparently real and reciprocal. TCU could join the league as soon as next season. One reason: There is no financial penalty to leave the Mountain West.

**Poor Jaime Hill. The BYU defensive coordinator was fired after Friday's loss at Utah State. You expect that in the SEC, but at BYU? Hill joined the staff from the CFL in 2006 and was promoted to defensive coordinator in 2008. BYU, 1-4, is off to its worst start in almost four decades.

Some other d-coordinators who might want to watch their backs:

Tyrone Nix, Mississippi. The Rebs got upset by Jacksonville State giving up 49 points and got beat by Vandy, 28-14. Had to hold off Kentucky 42-35 on Saturday. Rebels allowing almost 33 points per game.

Doug Mallory, New Mexico. Not really fair because his future is tied to embattled head coach Mike Locksley. The Lobos have allowed a I-A-most 35 touchdowns and 52.6 points per game.

Co-coordinators Keith Patterson/Paul Randolph, Tulsa. The Hurricane gave up 51 points at East Carolina, losing on the last play of the game. Oklahoma State put up 65 on Tulsa which is 106th in pass efficiency defense.

Ray McCartney, Wake Forest. His defense has given up 68 points to Stanford, 24 touchdowns in five games and 36.8 points per game.

**Team Schizo: Washington has lost to the worst BYU team in years, got run off its home field by Nebraska and now has beaten USC in consecutive seasons.

**Team Schizo II: Kansas lost to Baylor by almost seven touchdowns, 55-7, in Waco. Not even the locals care about Baylor, a Big 12 doormat. There were an estimated 15,000 empty seats at Floyd Casey Stadium. It's bad when your team is intimidated by the Bears.

"When I went out there, they were bigger than I thought,” KU linebacker Steven Johnson told the Kansas City Star. “I’m just like, ‘What in the world are they eating?’ ”

Posted on: September 23, 2010 10:43 am
 

Latest Scripps Howard News Service Heisman poll

1. Denard Robinson, QB, Michigan, 17 carries, 104 yards rushing, 1 TD, 10-of-14, 241 yards passing, 2 TD passes, int., 43 (7).

2. Ryan Mallett, QB, Arkansas, 21-of-33 passing, 380 yards, 3 TDs, 30 (2).

3. Kellen Moore, QB, Boise State, 20-of-30 passing, 370 yards, 2 TDs, int., 26 (1).

4. Terrelle Pryor, QB, Ohio State, 8 carries, 35 yards, TD, 22-of-29, 235 yards passing, 2 TD passes, 2 ints., 21.

5. Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford, 17-of-23, 207 yards passing, 4 TDs, 3 carries, 69 yards rushing, TD run. 5.

Other receiving votes: Kendall Hunter, RB, Oklahoma State, (4), South Carolina RB Marcus Lattimore (3), Oklahoma QB Landry Jones (3), Alabama QB Greg McElroy (2), Nebraska QB Taylor Martinez (2), Alabama RB Mark Ingram (1), Kentucky WR Randall Cobb (1), Nevada QB Colin Kaepernick (1), Oregon RB LaMichael James (1).

(Scripps Howard News Service Heisman Trophy poll voters: Kirk Bohls, Austin (Texas) American-Statesman; Jimmy Burch, Fort Worth Star-Telegram; Dennis Dodd, CBSSports.com; Vahe Gregorian, St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Mike Griffith, The Knoxville (Tenn.) News-Sentinel; Michael Lewis, Salt Lake Tribune; Bob Condotta, Seattle Times; John Lindsay, Scripps Howard News Service; Tom Luicci, The (Newark) Star-Ledger; John Rohde, The Oklahoman.)
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com