Tag:Fiesta Bowl
Posted on: February 13, 2012 1:21 pm
Edited on: February 13, 2012 1:25 pm
 

My preseason top 25 applied to postseason models

You've got to start somewhere in shaping a new postseason model. Using this humble correspondent's preseason top 25 posted Monday as a template, here are a few possibilties. All of them are among the 50 or so discussed last month in New Orleans.

A seeded Plus One on campus (The Delany Model. Top-four rated teams meet in national semifinals):

No. 4 Oregon at No. 1 LSU and No. 3 Oklahoma at No. 2 USC.

Winners meet this season in the Orange Bowl based on the BCS rotation.

A Plus One in the bowls Oregon vs. LSU in the Cotton Bowl. Oklahoma vs. USC in the Sugar Bowl. Winners meet in the Orange Bowl.

An unseeded Plus One (Playing a championship game after the bowls. In this model, all six BCS league champions guaranteed a berth. No. 7 Arkansas and No. 9 Georgia are left out. Unranked Rutgers is in as Big East champion. A human committee and/or rankings determine the top two teams after the bowls):

Rose Bowl: USC* vs. Wisconsin*

Fiesta Bowl: Oklahoma* vs. Oregon

Sugar Bowl: LSU* vs. Clemson*

Orange Bowl:  Rutgers* vs. Alabama

*-conference champs

Two highest-ranked teams after the bowls meet for the national championship. Championship game location TBA.

No automatic qualifiers (No. 1 vs. No. 2 meet in the championship game. Four other major bowls are populated by the remaining teams in the top 10. Ohio State not eligible. In this scenario, five SEC teams are included. Big East and ACC not represented because no teams are ranked in top 10.)

BCS title game (Orange Bowl): LSU vs. USC

Rose: Oregon vs. Wisconsin

Sugar: Alabama vs. West Virginia

Fiesta: Oklahoma vs. South Carolina

Cotton: Georgia vs. Arkansas

Are there any other postseason models? Probably. For now, this is your lump of Play-Doh to shape.

 


Posted on: February 13, 2012 1:21 pm
Edited on: February 13, 2012 1:25 pm
 

My preseason top 25 applied to postseason models

You've got to start somewhere in shaping a new postseason model. Using this humble correspondent's preseason top 25 posted Monday as a template, here are a few possibilties. All of them are among the 50 or so discussed last month in New Orleans.

A seeded Plus One on campus (The Delany Model. Top-four rated teams meet in national semifinals):

No. 4 Oregon at No. 1 LSU and No. 3 Oklahoma at No. 2 USC.

Winners meet this season in the Orange Bowl based on the BCS rotation.

A Plus One in the bowls Oregon vs. LSU in the Cotton Bowl. Oklahoma vs. USC in the Sugar Bowl. Winners meet in the Orange Bowl.

An unseeded Plus One (Playing a championship game after the bowls. In this model, all six BCS league champions guaranteed a berth. No. 7 Arkansas and No. 9 Georgia are left out. Unranked Rutgers is in as Big East champion. A human committee and/or rankings determine the top two teams after the bowls):

Rose Bowl: USC* vs. Wisconsin*

Fiesta Bowl: Oklahoma* vs. Oregon

Sugar Bowl: LSU* vs. Clemson*

Orange Bowl:  Rutgers* vs. Alabama

*-conference champs

Two highest-ranked teams after the bowls meet for the national championship. Championship game location TBA.

No automatic qualifiers (No. 1 vs. No. 2 meet in the championship game. Four other major bowls are populated by the remaining teams in the top 10. Ohio State not eligible. In this scenario, five SEC teams are included. Big East and ACC not represented because no teams are ranked in top 10.)

BCS title game (Orange Bowl): LSU vs. USC

Rose: Oregon vs. Wisconsin

Sugar: Alabama vs. West Virginia

Fiesta: Oklahoma vs. South Carolina

Cotton: Georgia vs. Arkansas

Are there any other postseason models? Probably. For now, this is your lump of Play-Doh to shape.

 


Posted on: December 5, 2011 7:17 pm
Edited on: December 5, 2011 7:41 pm
 

Sugar-Fiesta were talking OU-OSU trade

The Sugar Bowl was actively seeking a trade of BCS teams with the Fiesta Bowl had Oklahoma beaten Oklahoma State, Sugar CEO Paul Hoolahan told CBSSports.com on Monday.

Hoolahan said he was in contact with Big 12 interim commissioner Chuck Neinas about working the deal that would have brought Oklahoma to New Orleans in exchange for Oklahoma State. That would have relieved Oklahoma from so-called “Fiesta Fatigue” by taking the Sooners had they lost Saturday to Oklahoma State. Per BCS procedure, the Sugar would actually had to take Oklahoma State with the first overall pick then wait until the selection procedure was over before working the trade for the Sooners.

Oklahoma has been in the Fiesta Bowl three of the last five years. The Sooners have played in New Orleans once since 1972. That was the 2003 BCS title game against LSU. The trade, of course, was predicated on LSU and Alabama remaining 1-2 in the BCS. It is allowable per the BCS contract. 

The Sugar ended up with Michigan and Virginia Tech.

“I was working with Neinas throughout the week prior to selections on a possible Oklahoma trade …” Hoolahan said. “We had that greased and ready to go.”

“A lot of time was spent looking at that,” he added. “A lot of time was spent looking at similar situations regarding Virginia Tech. Virginia Tech’s name didn’t come in out of the blue.”

A second source from the Fiesta Bowl confirmed the trade talks. Neinas did not immediately return a call for comment. Because it lost both LSU and Alabama as SEC anchors, the Sugar had the first and third picks in the BCS process. Michigan was the first pick.

While the trade talk doesn’t directly address the reason why Kansas State was left out of the Sugar Bowl, it does begin to explain the Sugar Bowl’s thinking. It needed a so-called “anchor” team to pair with a second participant. Michigan became a worthy choice and the potential trade was off when Oklahoma State beat the Sooners.

The Wolverines return to New Orleans for the first time since 1984. If there are less than 10 automatic BCS qualifiers, teams ranked in the top 14 of the final BCS standings that have won at least nine games are eligible for at-large selection. That explains the leeway BCS bowls have in creating their best matchup. 

An Oklahoma win in Bedlam likely would have put a second Big 12 team (Oklahoma State) in the BCS.  

While ticket sales didn’t figure to be issue in either of the possible games involving Michigan -- Michigan-Virginia Tech or Michigan-Kansas State – there are always television considerations. It could have been that Virginia Tech was a slightly better TV draw.

Virginia Tech itself is suffering from its own “Orange Bowl Fatigue” having been to South Florida as the ACC champion three out of the last four years. Still, the college football world wanted to know Monday why Virginia Tech made it over the more accomplished and higher-ranked Wildcats.

The two-loss Hokies come to New Orleans fresh off a four-touchdown beatdown from Clemson in the ACC title game. Virginia Tech beat one team (Georgia Tech) ranked at the time in the top 20. Its own coach, Frank Beamer, barely voted the Hokies within BCS at-large eligibility on his coaches’ poll ballot at No. 13. At-large teams in the top 14 are considered.

Meanwhile, Kansas State is ranked higher (No. 8, BCS) guided by a national coach of the year candidate in Bill Snyder.

Without getting into specifics, Hoolahan said it was  a matter of familiarity with Tech. “A fond relationship,” he called it. The Sugar contributed $250,000 to the school after the tragic shootings in 2007. This is the third time since 2000 and fourth time since 1995 the Hokies have been to New Orleans.

The Sugar Bowl doesn’t have a large volunteer base (125) which could also play into the decision. Compare that to the Fiesta Bowl which claims a volunteer base of close to 3,000. The Sugar is double-hosting in this BCS rotation, responsible for two BCS games within seven days.

With SEC powerhouses LSU and Alabama in the championship game, it could be one of the biggest and busiest weeks ever for the Sugar Bowl infrastructure. Anything to make the job easier – i.e. selecting a known commodity in Virginia Tech – could help.

Hoolahan called it inviting a “long-time friend and partner.”

The Sugar could also feel it is owed the freedom to make such a pick. Since 2008, it has hosted non-BCS schools Hawaii and Utah as well as the Big East’s Cincinnati. Essentially, the Sugar Bowl may feel it shouldn’t be criticized when it has taken teams with ticket and TV draw issues in recent years.

Those are lingering consequences of the BCS that will start to be dealt with when the commissioners meet next Jan. 10 in New Orleans.

Posted on: September 20, 2011 12:17 pm
 

Sugar Bowl made illegal contributions in '04, '06


The Sugar Bowl's executive director says it is an "embarrassment" that his organization made illegal contributions to former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco.

HBO's Real Sports program is scheduled to air a segment Tuesday night on the bowl's now admitted wrongdoing. The bowl purchased three $1,000 tickets honoring the former governor in 2004 and 2006. Sugar Bowl executive director Paul Hoolahan told CBSSports.com the acts do not rise to the level of wrongdoing at the Fiesta Bowl that cost that bowl's former executive director, John Junker, his job.

"There was no intent to conceal," Hollahan said. "It does not even approximate what was going on at the Fiesta Bowl."

Junker was fired in March after it was determined contributions were being to politicians by Fiesta employees who were then reimbursed. Hoolahan says it self-reported violations to the IRS after taking questions from Real Sports.

Sugar Bowl officials did not speak on camera to HBO. Instead, Real Sports correspondent Bernard Goldberg interviewed Football Bowl Association spokesman Bruce Bernstein.

In a segment of that interview now available on YouTube, Bernstein says the Fiesta Bowl scandal was "an isolated incident. I have never heard of another instance of where a bowl organization made a political contribution."

After being informed by Goldberg about the Sugar Bowl situation, Bernstein says, "I'm not familiar with that. But if the organization was foolish enough to have done that, it will get reported ..."


In a related matter, PlayoffPAC filed an IRS complaint against the Sugar Bowl based on the new information. 

In a statement, the Sugar Bowl confirmed that three tickets were purchased to two fundraising dinners honoring Blanco for a total of $3,000. After an internal audit, the bowl said it found "not other expenditures of this nature." PlayoffPAC says the total was $5,000.

The bowl added that the money has been refunded. The $3,000 will be donated to the National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete Fund.

"It's an embarrassment and we accept the embarrassment but five and seven years ago, it's a different age we live in," Hoolahan said. "Certainly [there has been] a lot of corrective action since then. It hasn't happed since. It's been non-recurring."

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: September 6, 2011 11:46 am
Edited on: September 6, 2011 11:49 am
 

National notes

Since I didn't get around to predicting the BCS bowls before the season actually started, let's just call this a BCS bowl preview (after one week).

BCS championship in New Orleans: Alabama* vs. Oklahoma*

Did nothing in Week 1 to change my opinion of the two best teams in the country.


Rose Bowl:
Oregon* vs. Wisconsin*

Oregon suddenly not a prohibitive favorite in the Pac-12.


Fiesta:
Texas A&M vs. Stanford

Fiesta gets supposed Heisman winner (Andrew Luck) against Big 12 runner-up.


Sugar:
LSU vs. Florida State

Tigers make it back to Sugar, but not the big one.


Orange:
West Virginia* vs. Virginia Tech*

Tech makes a return trip to South. Mountaineers giddy over return to BCS bowl.

*-automatic qualifier


--One reason why we saw all those games delayed or postponed by weather:

Lawyers, or the threat of them if even one person was injured, never mind or killed. Our society is so litigious that even one person slipping on a staircase could cost a school millions. That's why you saw 80,000 people evacuated from stadiums in a short period of time. It's obvious by the speed at which these teams were cleared that schools have prepared for this occurrence.

I can remember seasons when we didn't see this many weather-related delays. Now schools are erring on the side of safety. Who can blame Notre Dame for clearing the stadium twice after it lost a student videographer last season?


--Give Miami's Al Golden credit for not whining about his predicament at Miami.

"Eight of the 110 kids on our team had a significant issue for something they did three years ago?" Golden said. "We're moving on right now. I've been to the deepest depths in the NCAA."

Those depths would have been inheriting a roster with 54 scholarship players at Temple as well as NCAA and APR problems. The difference, as Golden has pointed out, Temple was shooting for a winning record. Miami wants to win championships.


--Yes, it's early and it probably means nothing but here's where you'll find last year's returning Heisman finalists in the current NCAA stats after one week.

Andrew Luck, Stanford: The Heisman runner-up threw for a modest 171 yards against San Jose State in a 57-3 blowout. He is 39th overall in pass efficiency.

LaMichael James, Oregon: Not listed in the top 100 after rushing for 54 yards in 18 carries against LSU. In his last two games, both against SEC superpowers, James has rushed for 103 yards on 31 carries.

Kellen Moore, Boise State: 21st in passing efficiency after completing 28 of 34 against Georgia. How does that get him to 21st after one of the biggest wins in Boise State history? Think of it this way: Moore is first on that list among quarterbacks who played a BCS-conference opponent in the first week.


--Weird stat of the week: Of Oregon's 83 scoring drives last season, it was forced to go more than 11 plays only five times. Oregon had to go 79 yards in 19 plays to score its first touchdown of the season against LSU. What looked at the time like a turning of the tide against the Tigers, turns out to be another reason to like LSU's defense.


--Baylor isn't likely to lose in the month of September. After this week's bye, the Bears have Stephen F. Austin and Rice at home. The conference opener is Oct. 1 at Kansas State and that's looking easier by the moment.

Look for more deserved Baylor hype. The Bears could be 5-0 heading into Texas A&M on Oct. 15.


--Way too early Heisman ballot:

1. Robert Griffin III, QB, Baylor: Best quarterback in the Big 12 after beating TCU. Felt like Friday Night Lights in Waco.
2. Tyrann Mathieu, CB, LSU: It's good to have a playmaker. It's great to have a playmaker on defense. It's almost impossible to have a game changer in the secondary.
3. Kellen Moore, QB, Boise State: Now, only the NFL has to take notice.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 11:14 am
Edited on: June 25, 2011 11:13 am
 

Willis McGahee wants his 2002 ring

 CORAL GABLES, Fla. – Former Miami running back Willis McGahee said he would “like to have my ring” if it is found that Ohio State won the 2003 BCS title game while competing with ineligible players.

The validity of that championship has reached no higher than speculation stage, but has been a topic of conversation given Ohio State’s current NCAA problems. McGahee, a former Hurricane great, told CBSSports.com that he still feels that Miami was “cheated” out of a win because of back judge Terry Porter’s controversial pass interference call.

Asked specifically if Miami should be declared national champions if Ohio State won with ineligible players, McGahee said: “I feel we were cheated anyway. We beat them. The pass interference with the eligible, ineligible players. It wouldn’t have made any difference. I can’t get my money back that I missed out on a second ring. If they did [cheat] I’d like to have my ring.”


Miami won the 2001 national championship and was beaten out for consecutive titles in 2002, losing to Ohio State 32-24 in double overtime. Porter’s call came on a play in which Miami’s Glenn Sharpe went up for a ball against Ohio State’s Chris Gamble came on a fourth-and-3 play from the Miami 5. That loss stopped a 35-game winning streak by the Hurricanes.

For Ohio State to be scrutinized, the NCAA would have to decide it is worth going back beyond the four-year statute of limitations to prosecute the Buckeyes. If players competed while ineligible at anytime, Ohio State would likely have to vacate victories. There is more of a chance that the program would have to vacate 2010 wins. There is no evidence that Ohio State played any ineligible players in 2002, only reports that players were receiving extra benefits for long periods of time. Nine years after that season, Al Golden is beginning his first with the Canes.

“He turned Temple around,” McGahee said recently following a workout on campus with several other NFL players. “The fact that he turned that program around says a lot about his character, his coaching staff. The good thing about it is, he came to the University of Miami.”

McGahee ran for 2,080 yards in two seasons at Miami. His college career ended after a devastating knee injury in the fourth quarter of that Ohio State game. McGahee came back, rehabbed his knee and become an effective NFL back over the past eight seasons.

McGahee’s agent, Drew Rosenhaus, is the same as just-departed Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor. It was Rosenhaus who marketed McGahee during his knee injury, allowing the back to be drafted 23rd overall only 3 ½ months after the injury.

Significant issues remain about Pryor’s talents heading into the supplemental draft.

“He’s [Rosenhaus] going to get in there and talk to the teams, tell them about his client [Pryor], get the word out,” McGahee said. “The knee, he did that. I did my part. I had to work.”

There is a Ohio State quarterback-Miami-McGahee connection. Former Heisman winner Troy Smith was a teammate with the Ravens.

“They said Troy Smith couldn’t play quarterback,” McGahee said. “I’ve known Troy for four years. He came out and won the Heisman Trophy. When he got his shot, he took advantage of it. If you have the ability to throw and read coverages, doesn’t matter how tall you are, as long as you have the heart.”

Posted on: June 13, 2011 6:32 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 6:39 pm
 

Fiesta Bowl close to having executive director

University of Arizona Robert Shelton is expected to be named the new executive director of the Fiesta Bowl, bowl sources told CBSSports.com Monday evening.

Pending the signing of documents to finalize the agreement, Shelton would replace John Junker who was fired amid scandal in March. Shelton is a native of Phoenix and a member of the BCS Presidential Oversight Committee. Shelton has been Arizona's president since July 1, 2006.

Earlier, the Fiesta approached Pac-12 deputy commissioner Kevin Weiberg, thought to be the frontrunner for the job. Weiberg told CBSSports.com last month that he was not interested in the position.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: May 24, 2011 7:59 pm
 

Pac-12's Weiberg not interested in Fiesta job

Kevin Weiberg will not be the next executive director of the Fiesta Bowl CBSSports.com has learned.

 

The Pac-12 deputy commissioner and CEO was thought to be the favorite for the job that opened when John Junker was fired in March after a scandal that resulted in the bowl nearly being expelled from the BCS. 

 

CBSSports.com reported on April 28 that the names of Weiberg, WAC commissioner Karl Benson and Big East associate commissioner Nick Carparelli had emerged in the search. Weiberg, 54, told CBSSports.com Tuesday that he was happy with his job. He is currently involved helping set up the conference's new network. The Fiesta expressed interest in interviewing Weiberg. The process was far from a formal job offer. 

 

 Earlier this month, the BCS fined the Fiesta $1 million for a lack of oversight during the scandal. The Fiesta was conditionally allowed to stay in the BCS. One of those conditions was that the bowl must consult with the BCS on the hiring of a new executive director.

 

Weiberg is a former Big Ten deputy commissioner who helped set up the conference's network. From 1998-2007 he was Big 12 commissioner. He resigned shortly after conference officials didn't follow his suggestion to consider starting a Big 12 network. 

Category: NCAAF
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com